15 thoughts on “Autoimmune Condition That Impact Females – Alopecia Areata

  1. this is fantastic! thank you….could I ask Dr I am male and have had a few
    bald spots near my chin in my beard they seem to be spreading. Ive heard it
    could be related to multivitamin use? Is this true as I have been taking
    High strength multivitamins also Biotin??

  2. I just want to mention that you forgot to talk about the psychological
    effects of this condition. As an alopecia patient myself, I now refuse to
    see any dermatologist about this disease! They are not helpful at all, as
    you mentioned about some doctors. You at least explained the situation that
    the immune system is going through, while my dermatologist tells me it’s
    not a big deal and sends me away with injections.

  3. Such as what? I found this vid very interesting because as the above poster
    said, other doctors will rarely tell you all this maybe because they think
    it’s pointless (?) But you didn’t really say HOW we can prevent it from
    spreading and things we can do to start controlling it or rebalancing the
    immune system process. I for one have only just discovered a few bald
    patches on my head in the last couple months – am desperate for more info
    on what I can do now 🙁

  4. What an eye opener! I have it for over 30 years and no doctor ever tell me
    this! Now I am going to really try to do something. thank you so much!

  5. Yes I’m taking patients with Alopecia Areata. That website menu is too
    small to list ALL the different conditions I’ve helped people with.

  6. He is referring to CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. This information and much more
    (pertaining to alopecia areata) is disclosed in a recently published
    article entitled, “Genetic Basis of Alopecia Areata: A Roadmap for
    Translational Research.” People are trying to help us; educate yourselves.

  7. I have a question for Dr.David Clark, after watching the video I decided to
    check out your website and to my disbelief you are in Durham, NC. I live in
    Raleigh and work in RTP so you are very close to home. I was wondering if
    you are taking patients for alopecia areata, since it’s not listed in your
    list of “I’VE HELPED PEOPLE SUFFERING WITH…”?

  8. It is so frusterating. Dermotologists have not helped at all. I have had
    reactive arthritis at 14 and now I am on a lupus drug for chronic eye pain,
    fatigue and burning scalp. The drug helps the eyes but my hair continues to
    fall out. My hair started to fall out 5 years ago, it has been a slow
    death, but I am finally accepting it. I am 48 and I know I can get through
    this

  9. Laura, if you’re tired all the time, that’s abnormal. See someone trained
    as I’ve described.

  10. Allopathic M.D.s just wanna pop us with dangerous Drugs. Drugs don’t cure.
    I have leaky gut found in urine test, yet no real help from the docs I’ve
    seen. Took all my money. I’m still sick.

  11. My question for this Dr. is what kind of Dr. should we see, then. I’ve been
    dealing with alopecia areata for over 30 years. Am currently almost totally
    bald. I also have Raynauds Phenomenon and autoimmune uticarea. So, I know I
    am being attacked in other ways, but who to see to treat the problem, not
    the symptoms? Would love to take care of it before it attacks something
    else.

  12. I would see someone trained AND experienced in Functional Medicine
    management of autoimmune condtionss AND whose practice is MAINLY Functional
    Medicine.

  13. I’m an RN w/ alopecia totalis. I’m speaking from healthcare and personal
    experience, a dermatologist is not going to help. And is giving you a
    band-aid treatment for something that is NOT a dermatologic disorder. I
    mean, they can only treat the symptom of the disorder, but they cannot cure
    the source.

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